My sister, our very own Mitali Mukherjee

Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury

Writing about someone we admire, adore and feel very much within ourselves is extremely difficult. It become more difficult when we have to write about someone, who not only is just our own, but is equally very precious and special. Mitali Mukherjee is no alien to the music lovers in Bangladesh and the world. She hails from Mymensing, a district very close to the one I hail. Mitali Mukherjee’s parents Amulya Kumar Mukherjee and Kalyani Mukherjee are also known for patronizing Bangla music in this part of the world. She began her formal training in classical music under Pundit Mithun Dey and subsequently she studied at the Maharaja Sayajrao University of Baroda in India.

Mitali Mukherjee’s first album “Saahil” was released by HMV. She collaborated with Oscar winning legendary lyricist Gulzar for her album “Chand Parosa Hai”. Mitali has sung in several languages, including Punjabi, Gujarati and Tamil. She received a triple disc for a song (from the Tamil blockbuster, “Dalpati”) composed by renowned South Indian music director Iliya Raja.

She tied the knot with ghazal maestro Bhupinder Singh in 1983 and since then has been living in India. But of course, her emotional attachment with Bangladesh would never get dented, as she said, “My feelings for Bangladesh, Brahmaputra and music lovers of my motherland are ever alive in my heart. Whenever I visit Bangladesh, I don’t feel like leaving”.

To Bangladeshi music lovers and especially those who are looking for a powerful melodious voice, possibly there is no alternative to Mitali Mukherjee until now. Being a lyricist and tuner, I do want to want; she has an enormously versatile voice, which possibly can only be termed as God-gifted. As I also run a music company in Bangladesh, I do know, most of the singers, especially female singers, miss touching the notes of a tune’s higher part, while singing the song. To the audience, who may not have the ear of classical music or tunes and notes, such lacking may not be noticed, but those of us, who have spent many years learning classical music and even today spending hours listening to the music through headphones, instead of simply listening through speakers. There is distinctive difference in listening to any song through the headphone, as the chords and notes of the songs become very much clear to a music-conscious listener. A tune – more precisely a song embraces death when the singer misses touching the note. It is like falling of a glass of water from the hand, right before drinking, and especially when someone is terribly thirsty.

But will Mitali Mukherjee, she would always touch the right note and deliver the song in a magnificent way. Frankly, God has gifted her voice to hypnotize her audience. I call her a magician of melody instead of just a singer.

As a human being, she is most wonderful and very much down to earth. She does not have the false vanity of a celebrity. False pride actually would never find any place in any true music lover. But of course, we are extremely proud of her – of course because, she is the daughter of this soil – our very own Bangladesh.

Although I am in journalism since 1989, it was only 2006, when I stepped into the world of music as a lyricist and tuner. But unfortunately, my luck has not clicked yet to find an opportunity of meeting Mitali Mukherjee in person. God willing, when I get this opportunity, I surely will humbly request her to sing just two lines of her famous song – Kew Konodin Amarey to Kotha Dilona. And of course, if she ever will sing a song written and tuned by me that will be the most precious award in my life. With the hope Mitali Mukherjee may read this article, I am sharing a song written and tuned by me below.

Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury is the editor of Blitz. Follow him on Twitter at @Salah_Shoaib

 

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