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House Republicans prepare to impeach Joe Biden after midterm

Joe Biden, Biden, Afghanistan, Congress, Democrats, Republicans, Midterms

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House Republicans prepare to impeach Joe Biden after midterm

President Joe Biden may suffer the same fate as his predecessor if a group of conservative Republicans in the House get their way.

Should the party retake control of the chamber following the November midterms, they will move to impeach Biden for a number of issues, according to The Hill.

“A number of rank-and-file conservatives have already introduced impeachment articles in the current Congress against the president,” the outlet reported Tuesday. “They accuse Biden of committing ‘high crimes’ in his approach to a range of issues touching on border enforcement, the coronavirus pandemic, and the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.”

“At least eight resolutions to impeach Biden have been offered since he took office: Three related to his handling of the migrant surge at the southern border; three targeting his management of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan last year; one denouncing the eviction moratorium designed to help renters during the pandemic; and still another connected to the overseas business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden,” The Hill continued.

The report added:

Those resolutions never had a chance of seeing the light of day, with Democrats holding a narrow control of the lower chamber. But with Republicans widely expected to win the House majority in the midterms, many of those same conservatives want to tap their new potential powers to oust a president they deem unfit. Some would like to make it a first order of business.

“I have consistently said President Biden should be impeached for intentionally opening our border and making Americans less safe,” Rep. Bob Good (R-Va.), said, according to The Hill. “Congress has a duty to hold the President accountable for this and any other failures of his Constitutional responsibilities, so a new Republican majority must be prepared to aggressively conduct oversight on day one.”

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) has led the drive to impeach Biden.

“She believes Joe Biden should have been impeached as soon as he was sworn in, so of course she wants it to happen as soon as possible,” said Nick Dyer, a spokesman for the congresswoman, in an email to The Hill.

The outlet noted that conservatives now making plans to impeach Biden are similar to those by leftist Democrats ahead of the 2018 midterms when the Democrats took over control of the House in January 2019.

Then, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), fearful that it would harm Democrats in swing districts, quashed the effort. But it was revived after a U.S. Army officer, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, accused then-President Donald Trump of improperly withholding military aid to Ukraine in exchange for a commitment from its president, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate alleged Biden family corruption.

Trump denied the ‘quid pro quo’ and his administration even took the unprecedented step of releasing a transcript of his phone call with Zelensky, but that didn’t matter: Democrats impeached him for the first time, though the GOP-controlled Senate failed to convict.

“At least eight resolutions to impeach Biden have been offered since he took office: Three related to his handling of the migrant surge at the southern border; three targeting his management of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan last year; one denouncing the eviction moratorium designed to help renters during the pandemic; and still another connected to the overseas business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden,” The Hill noted.

Those resolutions will expire when the term of the current Congress ends, so they would have to be reintroduced in January 2023 after the new Congress is sworn in.

Not all Republicans are on board, of course. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has already spoken out against trying to impeach Biden for the same reason Pelosi wavered; he believes doing so will harm Republicans at the polls ahead of the 2024 presidential election, according to The Hill.

“On the other hand, ignoring the conservatives’ impeachment entreaties might spark a revolt from a Republican base keen to avenge the Democrats’ two impeachments of Trump, who remains the most popular national figure in the GOP,” the outlet added.

Contents published under this byline are those created by the news team of BLiTZ

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