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European leadership crisis at its peak

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European leadership crisis at its peak

Assaf Minor

The mass demonstrations on the streets of Paris should not have been surprising. Although the official excuse for the demonstrations was the expected tax hike on fuel, the truth is that the French economy is in a deep and long crisis. In fact, the former finance minister who led the ongoing crisis is the same person who is currently sitting on the Champs-Elysées – Emanuel Makron.

It’s not that the French did not know who they chose. Makaron’s economic policy was one of the main reasons why the previous president, Francois Hollande, was so hated. They knew, but they had no other options. The alternatives were the right-wing leader Le Pen, the corrupt Francois Peyon, Manuel Waltz, who was the prime minister of the hated Netherlands, and the extreme leftist Melanchon. Of these, they chose the lesser of two evils. And this is very bad for them.

Emmanuel Makron is the poster child of the direction the entire West is heading – a very serious leadership crisis, almost unprecedented. Most of the major Western countries are at one stage or another of the crisis, and Russia’s and China’s recent growth in the region can also be attributed, among other things, to the Western leadership crisis.

Merkel and the heirs:

Take Germany as an example. Angela Merkel was considered for many years as the continent’s strongest leader, “the mother of Europe”. Since 2005, she has served as chancellor and is expected to close the record for the longest term. But what began as a powerful regime is about to end in a weak voice.

In the elections for the Bundestag last year, its party won, but with a small gap, and for many months the German Federation was run without a functioning government. Even when it was established, it is particularly rickety. About a month ago, Merkel announced that she would retire at the end of her current term. At the moment, there is no candidate on the German political horizon who can be identified as the successor.

The Socialist Party is broken, and for the moment its leaders are not sweeping the German public, which in general is moving to a much more right. Merkel’s party has already begun to battle, and to date there are three candidates – Merkel’s protege, Engert Kramp-Karnbauer, who is now secretary general of the party, Frederick March, who was ousted 16 years ago, and current health minister Jens Schpan. With the exception of March, none of them is a gifted speaker, and certainly not close to the status Merkel has enjoyed over the years.

Mai on the way out?

Even on the British island, the leadership crisis cries out to the sky. In the 2015 elections, David Cameron won 330 seats and significantly increased the conservative majority. It was not a very large absolute majority, but stable. Cameron was also perceived as a strong leader and a particularly successful prime minister, certainly after the crises left by the Labor prime ministers he promised to go to a referendum on leaving the kingdom in the European Union and when the British people chose to leave the union he resigned, even though the vast majority of his party and the rival parties preferred to continue serving. They understood that Cameron had the best chance of bringing a successful retirement agreement, but Cameron, like an English gentleman, decided to resign and not lead the country in a course he did not believe in.

In a vote for the Berkshire, the British public voted against all the leaders, including the charismatic Cameron, preferring the position of mediocre leaders like Nigel Prague. They chose the idea, not the figure. Similarly, the strengthening of Jeremy Corbin , the anti-Semitic Labor leader in the past two years , is not due to his occupying personality, but rather to the notion that he is familiar to the his occupying personality, but rather to the notion that he is familiar to the

Unlike the Cameron, Teresa May inherited it, she did not enjoy the aura that surrounded her predecessor. At first it seemed promising , when May won the internal elections and was backed up from wall to wall in the party ranks. “Ice Woman” called her, the weight of “Iron Lady” attributed to Margaret Thatcher.

Indeed, at the beginning of her term, May broadcast uncompromising authority and leadership. Two years have passed since then, and today we can say that nothing remains of that promise. Mai was chosen not because of her impressive abilities, her leadership image, or her vision of the day after the Berkazit. She was chosen for one reason only – she was simply the last “responsible adult” in the Conservative Party. In other words, May was chosen for lack of choice.

Today’s estimates suggest that after the expected collapse of the British parliament’s Berkshire agreement next week, May will have to face a no-confidence motion that could eventually end up outside Downing.

An idea, not a leader conceptual discourse.

The result is that the public is less likely to follow its leaders and demands an orderly change of vision and a plan to implement it. In general, the public less believes in its leaders, and will not vote for them only because of personality. A lot of events have led to this, and the disappointment with Barack Obama seems to be at the top of them, but the crisis of the refugees in Europe that followed Angela Merkel’s policy also has a place of honor on the list of factors alongside the feeble policy vis-à-vis Russia and China, the rule of the European Union officials.

In the United States, the leadership crisis has advanced a step further in the recent presidential elections. Donald Trump, for his virtues and shortcomings, was a full-fledged outsider candidate. The party establishment tried its best to prevent its confrontation, and failed. This happened because the Republican public was fed up with the traditional party leadership and voted against it. Trump won the party not because he is a model of a great leader but because of what he symbolizes – a slap in the face to the political establishment. Then he began to develop a message and an idea.

The Democratic Party was much more conservative towards the establishment, and at the same time Bernie Sanders achieved results that no one believed would succeed. Sanders, despite being a senator for many years, was also considered an outsider in the Democratic Party, whose establishment leaders were anxious about being elected as president.

For many years, world politics stopped talking about ideas and focused on personalities. When Obama was elected in 2008, he did not speak of his great ideas, his perfect vision or the liberal vision. All this came after his election. When Obama was elected in 2008, he did not speak of his great ideas, his perfect vision or the liberal vision. All this came after his election. When Obama was elected, everyone spoke of one thing – the first black president in the White House. A personal discourse, and not a was elected, everyone spoke of one thing – the first black president in the White House. A personal discourse, and not a conceptual discourse.

The result is that the public is less likely to follow its leaders and demands an orderly change of vision and a plan to implement it. In general, the public less believes in its leaders, and will not vote for them only because of personality. A lot of events have led to this, and the disappointment with Barack Obama seems to be at the top of them, but the crisis of the refugees in Europe that followed Angela Merkel’s policy also has a place of honor on the list of factors alongside the feeble policy vis-à-vis Russia and China, the rule of the European Union officials.

Even in the Italian elections the citizens chose the idea of ​​the Five Star Party and the Northern League, not its leaders. In fact, none of them serves as prime minister, but rather as another candidate agreed upon by the parties. The rise of the “alternative to Germany” party is also an ideological choice rather than a personal choice, as evidenced by the change of leadership in the party that has not changed anything at the rate of its growth.

Marin Le Pen is not a charismatic leader, and she is a particularly weak speaker, but her ideas were welcomed in present-day France. Bernie Sanders sold the young Democrats a vision, a Communist on the border of suicidal, but a clear path. All these have bought the public, not as charismatic leaders, but as movements.

The blind belief in the lost leaders of the West brought us back to focusing on ideas. The public wants clear plans and a real and detailed vision, and this is provided by the movements that rise in the West. Call them populist, but in the end, they are the only ones that present a real way and a goal.

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